Auto Repair Service

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Engine Piston

Piston Ring Failure – Causes and Prevention

One of the major complaints that I have heard from many mechanics, and engine technicians, is that piston rings in heavy duty tractor engines wore out prematurely. I have heard this complaint many times. As per normal human responses, there is a quest to rationale the reasons as to why this component failed, as per the complaints from those in the field.

Not surprising, complaints of piston ring failure are blamed on the manufacturer of the rings. It’s not unusual to hear “Do not use these types of rings” and specific manufacturers are mentioned. However, I have heard these complaints about rings from OEM companies as well.

 My analysis led to several pertinent discoveries, especially after a particular customer asked for Original Caterpillar Piston Rings, not the rings presented to him. Little that that customer knows that the rings presented to him were manufactured by the same company that is on contract for Caterpillar. The first mistake that is made that contributes to major ring failure, is the seemingly economic benefit, of changing the piston rings only, however, the piston pin, piston pin retainer, and the cylinder liners are left in the used condition. These reused parts have clearances due to normal wear on the metal parts that contributes to slight but permanent vibrations within the entire engine. These almost invisible vibrations will lead to premature wear on all components, and most importantly, to the vibration of the rings on the piston head.

An engine with a 2800 rpm rating, with minor vibrations at that high speed, will have additional stress and strain on internal engine components. Other than the vibrations mentioned above, the used cylinder liner itself is damaged, with microscopic indentations, scratches, and worn out sections. This contributes to an uneven surface that the new piston rings have to move up and down in at 2800 rpm.

It’s this phenomenon that contributes to premature ring failure. Piston rings from original companies like Caterpillar and Cummins, will fail prematurely in this situations. Aftermarket piston rings from other reputable companies will fail prematurely in these situations. The problem is in reused cylinder liners, and not piston rings.

It’s not unusual therefore, that both OEM and aftermarket companies do not provide a warranty for rings that were changed without also changing the other internal components, namely the cylinder liner, piston, piston pin, and piston pin retainer.

While specific company warranty applies, most of them will consider this practice as voiding the warranty. The recommended thing to do, even though it’s a little more expensive, is to change all of the liner kits at the same time. Its more work, it’s a little more money, however, the results are better engine performance, less breakdown possibility, less fuel consumption, less pollution and GHG emissions, and the most important part, more peace of mind for the owner/manager.

I have for you more about the engine piston failures you can visit this website[www.thecarproblems.com/engine-piston-failures/]

I, Fouzi thank you for your visit and subscribe to my website.If you are looking to overhaul your car engine you can contact me for free quotation,prices, and advice. And if you are looking for auto parts and accessories you can visit some of the stores on the side bar they offer free shipping, coupon, and discount.

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18/09/2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Comments Off on Engine Piston

Car Engine Repaired Or Replaced?

                          

Car Engine Repaired Or Replaced?

Having to replace an air pump is inconvenient, but tolerable. Replacing a muffler or alternator is more costly and thus, more frustrating. But it’s still bearable. Your car’s engine, on the other hand, is among the few assemblies (your transmission is the other one) where a failure can crush your budget.

Your engine will not last forever, of course. Depending on how hard you drive it and the number of miles you put on it, you can expect it to last between 100,000 miles and twice that amount. If you keep your vehicle long enough, it will eventually develop major problems.

Below, we’ll explore the decision to fix the assembly versus having it replaced. We’ll explain why uncovering the root causes of a given problem is a critical piece to making this decision. Lastly, we’ll describe the key differences between a brand new engine and a remanufactured unit.

Deciding Whether To Repair The Assembly

Suppose your vehicle is eight or nine years old and you’ve driven it extremely hard over those years. As a result, your engine has finally failed. The first question to ask is whether you should keep your car, or retire it and buy a new one. A lot depends on its age, value, and overall condition.

For example, if your car has a market value of $2,500, spending over $1,000 to have your engine repaired (or replaced) may make little sense. But if your vehicle has retained its value and other major components (e.g. transmission) remain in good shape, spending the money might be worthwhile.

Let’s suppose you have decided to keep your car. Now, the question becomes whether you should have the failing engine repaired or replaced. Your decision will largely hinge on its condition and the number of miles on it.

For example, if the assembly has 130,000 miles, a history of valve or piston problems, and a chronic misfire, repairing it will be costly. The mechanic might need to perform extensive work on the cylinders. He may need to align the engine block and replace the valves.

Also, with an overhaul, the entire assembly must be dismantled. The individual pieces are disassembled, so the mechanic can check for blemishes, fissures, or other structural problems. The components that are in good condition are then cleaned. The ones that are in poor condition are replaced. Once the parts have either been cleaned or replaced, the assembly is put back together.

This is painstaking work. An engine overhaul requires an enormous amount of time and effort. This is the reason a lot of mechanics will strongly suggest having the engine replaced.

Differences Between New And Remanufactured Engines

You can buy a used assembly from a junkyard, but doing so may be dangerous. There’s no way to be certain whether there are problems hidden from view, especially with engines that have a lot of miles. Even if you find a used assembly with low miles and a limited warranty, it will usually be a less-than-ideal option. The price will be consistent with a remanufactured unit, which will have been brought up to OEM standards. At that point, you’re better off investing in the latter.

A new engine is exactly how it sounds. Every individual piece is new. The valves, pistons, engine block, connecting rods, and other parts have never been used.

A remanufactured unit is nearly as good (and far less expensive). Remans are used assemblies that have been dismantled, closely examined, and carefully cleaned. Most of the pieces that wear over time (e.g. timing belt, gaskets, etc.) are replaced. Then, the assembly is rebuilt and tested to ensure it meets OEM standards.

Which option is best? If your budget is limited, a remanufactured engine that has been brought up to OEM specifications is an ideal solution. It will get your car back on the road without the high cost associated with a new assembly.

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17/08/2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Car Engine Repaired Or Replaced?

   

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